Your questions answered about buying tickets and seating …

New to using a ticket site to buy tickets to the events you want to attend? My name is Ira Zoot … I've owned and run Ticketstub.com for the last decade. I'm going to offer you a few tips to getting the right tickets whether it's for a sporting event, a concert or a night out at the theater.

Start out by going to www.TicketStub.com. Once there … find the link for the event you want to attend on the home page. If you don’t see your event already listed on the page … no problem at all. Just go to the search box at the top of the page, enter the event name and click the search button. That search will return a list of all the available dates, venues and cities where you can attend that event. Find the event date you’re interested in and click “available tickets”. This will take you to a page that has all of the available tickets in real time as well as … in most cases an interactive venue map/seating chart.

If you don't already know what section you want to be in, the first thing you'll want to do is look at the venue map to see the different sections available. For instance, main floor seats, premium and club boxes, general admission area, grandstands, orchestra seating, bleachers and so on.

When you’ve decided on the venue location you want to be in just look on the left hand side and you’ll see all the tickets available.

The default settings will list the basic seats or to the most premium locations, boxes, VIP packages and meet & greets with the performer or team. The more premium and/or desired sections will cost more as the demand is higher and availability more limited. There is an easy to use "control panel" at the top of the inventory list that allows you to change the ticket listing order to what works best for you. When the venue maps are interactive you can click on a section/s and just show the tickets in those section/s.

Now that you’ve found the event you want all you need to do is select the tickets that work best for you and it will take you to the order form to finalize your purchase. Have a great time!


Available tickets and venue map

This brings me to a question I get a lot from people when choosing their tickets.

Q: I was looking at Taylor Swift tickets in section "xx", row "xx" and I see a few sets but one is priced at $150 and the other at $250. Are the more expensive tickets "better"?

A: No … Just because a ticket is higher priced in the same section and row doesn't mean that it will be better than the cheaper tickets in the same location.

People tend to think that if the tickets cost more then they must be better seats … that isn't always the case. Especially when they are in the same section and even row it doesn’t apply. We work with many other brokers who list tickets with us and they set the price of those tickets. It’s done according to their own acquisition costs and what they feel is the “market value”. This is what causes the confusion with pricing of seats in the same sections and rows. 

In this case … definitely go for the lesser priced tickets … they will be just as good. Not to mention … you'll have plenty of money left for a nice meal and some drinks

difprice

Q: Why can't you tell me the seat numbers?

A: Good question! The reason is that in many cases the tickets are bought from season ticket holders or fan club members. The teams, schools and performers don’t always approve of people reselling their tickets and will take away their season ticket packages.

Nothing to worry about tho … your seats will always be together unless it’s otherwise noted. If you still want to know the seat numbers you can always call us directly and in many cases we can get those seat numbers for you.

Q: What does obstructed view mean?

A: Another great question. What does “obstructed view” mean? It’s actually pretty self explanatory … for instance it may mean there will be a post in your way, over hang from the upper deck, the scoreboard.  In the event of a concert, you might be too far over on the side and won't be able to see the performers. Those seats aren’t beyond considering if you’re one of those fans that likes to wander about the venue to different locations since they’re usually pretty inexpensive and they get you into the venue. (Shhh don’t tell anyone I told you this. )

Obstructed

Q: I see parking passes listed with the tickets … do they get you into the event as well?

A: Nope … parking passes do get placed in with the ticket listings but they definitely don’t get you into the event itself. So please make sure you are aware of this before you buy a parking pass because you’re thinking it will get you in at a cheaper price. All it will get you is into the parking lot ... then a lot of frustration when you go to the gate and are denied admission.

Q: What’s included with a VIP Package, a “Meet and Greet”, pre show/game parties or club levels?

A: Another good question …

Meet and Greets - VIP packages - below are some of the things that can be … but are not always included with these passes and packages. Please be aware that these will vary from Artist to Artist and Team to Team … let me repeat … sometimes they will offer more and others less.

So when you are interested in these types of tickets, unless it has a detailed description already please call us and we will confirm what’s included. We want you to be as happy as possible.

•  One reserved ticket within first 10 - 15 rows of the stage

  Meet & Greet with the performer or team

•  Personal photograph with the performer or team

•  Specially designed performer or team apparel item  

•  Exclusive tour gift item

•  Official Meet & Greet laminate

•  Commemorative VIP concert ticket

•  VIP Parking

•  VIP venue access for quick entry and exit

•  Pre or post show parties, food and drinks

•  VIP Limo service

Q: What’s a “Club Pass” and “Club Section”?

A: A “Club Pass” is a special pass to the venue’s VIP club that’s open at the venue during the show or game. Please keep in mind that VIP passes do not always include a ticket to the event itself. Club passes also don't always guarantee customers an actual seat at the venue.

The Club” is a special section of seats in the theater, stadium and/or concert venues. Many Club seats include special access to a VIP club during the show or game. (Please make sure to look at all listing notes about possible amenities. If unsure please contact us.)

Q: What does General Admission mean? Lawn seats?

Lawn Seats

A: In both cases it means that seats are on a first come, first serve basis when you get to the event that same day. It’s always a good idea to get there early and “stake out” your spot for the show. If you went to the venue later good seating gets very hard to find. Ticket holders in GA seating do not receive actual seat numbers. You have to find your own place to sit or stand at will in the GA area.

When you buy Lawn Seats … what you’re getting is GA tickets that allow you to find a place to see / hear the show on a grass-covered section. Different than GA tho is they allow you to bring lawn chairs, blankets & such to set out and watch the show. These are among the least expensive tickets but they can also be some of the best seats if you want to hang with a bunch of your friends and socialize whilst listening to the music as well as watching it.

Lots of folks also buy these and GA tickets because they like to wander the venue to different areas trying to get closer. Of course, I don’t recommend it as there is no sure success and it may get you kicked out of the show. But I’d be lying if I said I didn’t try to do that “a time or 2” … I’m pretty happy watching the show from one place these days. 

Q: What does “Market Value” mean?

A: “Market Value” means that is the price that is set by the public “market” for tickets regardless of what the face value of them is. It’s all based on the popularity of the event as well as how many tickets are available for the show. Market value equates to what the ticket buyers are willing to pay for them. Event tickets are essentially the same as any commodity that has limited availability. If there are more people who want tickets than tickets available, the market price goes up.

We at TicketStub.com don’t set the pricing of the tickets listed with us except on those tickets that we own. Many of our tickets are owned by other brokers who we sell them for and get paid a commission. Their listed price is based on what we talked about before: supply and demand as well as what it costs them to buy the tickets. Much of the time they are paying over face value for the tickets from season ticket holders, fans who sell their tickets for whatever reason, etc.

Just a note: Many people think that brokers are the ones buying all the tickets up and leaving nothing for them at the Ticketmaster at the on sales date. Read through this article to get a better understanding of why tickets seem to disappear so fast at “face value”.

http://www.opposingviews.com/i/entertainment/music/most-concert-tickets-reserved-vips-going-sale-public-video

Most Concert Tickets Reserved for VIPs Before Going on Sale to Public (Video)

“”Many concert tickets for famous acts are almost gone by the time the public gets a chance to buy them. As much as 92 percent of tickets are saved for VIPs claims the Fan Freedom Project, which is financially supported by StubHub, a ticket reseller.””

Q: What does “On-sale” mean?

A: That is the time when tickets are officially released for sale to the general public.

Q: What does “Pre-Sales” mean?

A: This means selling tickets to certain select groups of people before their later release to the general public. Pre Sale ticket access is often given to fan club members or people with special industry connections. Many brokers have access to these tickets, but these days these tickets go mostly to those with “special” connections to the team, performer, promoter or venue. The is the  biggest reason that premium tickets are scarce from day one. People tend to blame the brokers - thinking they are getting all the great seats - leaving none for them. That may have been true at one time, but that’s not the case anymore.

Q: What does “Secondary Ticket Market” mean?

A: This refers to the many brokers and sites where tickets are resold to the public after being obtained on the primary market first. TicketStub.com and other online ticket sellers are actually the secondary rather than primary market sellers. Licensed brokers listing their tickets on Ticketstub.com are reselling tickets they either purchased from primary market sellers (eg: Ticketmaster or the venue) or from other ticket holders who for whatever reason weren’t going to attend the event.

Something you want to keep in mind when buying tickets on the secondary market is there will be “service fees” listed.  Is that secondary market, sellers in ALL industries charge a commission fee when reselling their products. They do this because they need to be compensated for the service costs and additional fees they are charged by the primary market sellers when they are buying tickets. This is one of the factors why secondary market costs more than primary … along with the popularity and the availability of tickets to the events.

Q: What is a “Service Fee”?

A: The service fee charged is to compensate businesses for managing and handling ticket  orders. Other names for service fees include “handling,” “processing,” or “convenience” charges. Please note that all businesses charge a service fee of some sort to their respective customers. 

This includes all relevant sellers in the primary and secondary ticket markets (websites and ticket sellers). The service fees for ticket resale websites often range between 20-30% of the ticket price of the tickets purchased. (Ticketstub.com has among the lowest service fees in the ticket resale industry - 18.5%.)

Be aware that in almost all cases when a ticket seller says there are no service fees … that isn’t really the case. What they’ve done and what most brokers did in the past was just build the service into the whole ticket price to make it appear cheaper.

For instance, in cases like this where the service fee is built in: You’ll see tickets listed for $100 per and you buy 2 … and on the order form it will just show that $200 for the tickets and the shipping fees. Then on sites that break the prices down on the order form: You’ll see tickets listed for $85 per and you buy 2 … and on the order form it will just show that $170 for the tickets, $15x2 for the service fee and the shipping fees. 

So you’re not really getting the better deal you might be led to think you are. With the service fees showing, what you pay still adds up to pretty much the same total price. It’s done purely to lessen the “sticker shock”. Ticket prices vary from site to site and at Ticketstub.com we try to be among the most competitive in pricing out there.

Q: What are Hard Tickets?

A: Hard Tickets are the traditional style tickets that are printed usually on a light “Cardboard” material so they will be durable. They are easy to have effective security features printed on them such as holograms or magnetic bar codes to ensure the legitimacy of the ticket. 

If you buy your tickets from someone outside the venue, please make sure you well know what “real” tickets look like. People “scalping” tickets in front are many times people looking to cheat you with fake tickets. Also, make sure to look at the event date on the tickets. People will also try to mislead others by selling tickets for games or events that have already occurred. 

If you buy from these people you have no recourse to get your money back. That’s why you’re much better off buying your tickets from the original source or from secondary market brokers like Ticketstub.com® that are well known and offer a 100% guarantee. Also, be aware that all tickets listed on Ticketstub.com are going to be “hard tickets” unless otherwise noted.

Q: What are E-Tickets?

A: E-Tickets are those tickets that are e-mailed in PDF form that you would then download and print out after you purchase them. When you buy them online from a secondary market broker like Ticketstub.com® there are a couple of ways you could receive your ticket. We may email the PDF file or e-tickets to you....which you would then print out and take to the gate with you to be scanned for entry to the venue or a print out of the e-tickets.

The selling brokers on the secondary market may also choose to ship a printed copy of the e-tickets to you via Fed-Ex and hold on to the PDF at their office. They do this for security reasons due to people making multiple copies and selling those as valid e-tickets. No worries if you get your tickets like this … they are every bit as legitimate and valid. If you happen to lose the print out you can always contact the seller and ask for another copy of the print out. So you’re covered there

Something to remember when buying multiple tickets by this method … the printed PDF document can be scanned only once for ALL the tickets on that order. Once it’s been scanned into the system it can no longer be used. So it’s very important that everyone going in on those multiple order e-tickets is there at the time. I’ve had a number of calls from customers at the venue telling me the e-tickets weren’t working and in all cases they had printed multiple copies so groups could get there at different times.

Q: What does “Ticketfast” mean?:

A: Ticketfast is the “name brand” of e-ticket that is sold by primary ticket supplier Ticketmaster.

Q: What are “Paperless Tickets”?

A: With the growing use of mobile/smart phones this is a way to go to the venue and have them electronically verify your tickets or they can verify the tickets by scanning the credit card used for the purchase.When going to events using paperless tickets bought on the secondary market a brokers representative will meet you at the venue to escort you into the event.

Q: Where’s the best place to sit for a concert, a play or a sporting event?

A: That’s really based on a lot of variables … personal and financial. Let’s start with concerts.

What’s the best place to sit when going to Concerts?

There is no one answer to this question. It depends on personal preference, the music or performer styles, the stage effects and … the other concert goers.

What I hear a lot is “I want to sit as close as possible to the stage. Are these the best seats?”  For some people … absolutely these are going to be the best seats for them. If they want to be close to the performers, be amongst the excited crowd that ends up standing or dancing for most of the show. The energy and excitement of the crowd can make sitting up front an amazing experience.

On the other hand … if you are wanting to go to the show to enjoy the music and not so much “actively participate” in it. The closet rows probably aren’t for you. When choosing front row / ultra close tickets, be aware that the music is likely going to be much louder - which for some can make for an unpleasant experience. Fans ( in the majority of cases ) tend to stand and are pretty “active” in the front rows. This can add to the fun and excitement of a show.

If you’re someone who is going to want to sit and enjoy the show sitting very close to the stage isn’t going to work well for you. You’re likely going to be unable to see or have a limited view of  the performers or stage as people will be standing in front of you.

You’d be better off either a bit farther back on the main floor but you’ll still find yourself standing during periods of the show if you want to see the performers over the other concert goers. Also, in most of the venues the sound quality is pretty good and the sound techs know how to best make sure everyone can hear well.

So … I usually recommend the seats that are to the right or left in front of the stage on the tiered riser sections. For example, The Eagles in Chicago at the United Center. It would be sections 121 and 122 on the right of the stage and 113 and 112 on the left of the stage. In these sections if people stand you can still see if you choose to sit. The sound will still be fantastic and the sight lines will be just as good.

You can look at the venue map at the sections and get a pretty good idea of what is going to be best for you. The final choice is going to have to really be based on the venue itself as they aren’t all set up the same or some performers will have “runways” that are built out into the audience.

Sitting in higher sections is not always going to make for a lesser experience … there are times it will make the experience even more enjoyable and at a more affordable price.

What’s the best place to sit when going to the Theater …

The info above for concerts can be applied when choosing seats to see a play or theater show as well. Of course … please consider that not all shows or theaters are set up the same way.

Something else to think about when choosing tickets for the theater is … if you’re in the front rows you’ll likely be spending the evening looking upwards at the stage. Which could leave you with an achy neck from looking upwards the whole show. You will possibly have an obstructed view of the entire stage because some productions have things going on across the whole area as opposed to just the center stage. At the same time being that close to the stage, and the performers can be an exhilarating experience. Or in the case of shows like the Blue Man Group actually able to participate in the show! So you have to look at the “big picture” when choosing your tickets.

Sitting very far upfront to the left or right of center in some venues may give you an obstructed view of the whole stage and performers. Please make sure you examine the venue seating map when choosing your tickets. Seats with obstructed views will 99% of the time note that in the description but if you have any questions, about it at all please call and ask.

You may have a better experience of the show and the staging from the 10th row back or from an upper tier where you can look more easily at the whole stage. Again, the view and sound in most of the venues is pretty good and tickets that are in obstructed areas will be noted as such in the inventory listing.

What’s the best place to sit when going to see Sports …

For sporting events, there are some similarities to the other categories as well as some very different things to consider when choosing your tickets. These things are going to depend on:

1)     What sport you’re going to see? As the venues are set up differently … please refer to the seating charts for reference.  Not all seating charts are the best. If you have anything that you feel you're missing, refer to the team’s or the venue’s official chart on their website. Then if you have further questions give us a call and we can help.

2)     Do you want to sit on “your team’s" side?

3)     How close to the dugout or team bench do you want to be?

4)     If it’s boxing or UFC event do you want to feel the sweat  and blood of the fighters?

5)     Are you going to a NHL game and do you want to be right at the glass?

6)     What sections are going to give you the best view of the playing area? 

7)     What types of fans do you want to be around … the hard core fans or the more “sedate” fans?

8)     Do you want a section that offers easy access to the vending areas? Has a wait staff?

9)     Are you looking for tickets for a company outing and need a suite with a food / drink package?

[Important] If you’re in need of a handicap accessible area and you don’t find anything that specifically states that to be the case with the tickets you see in our inventory, please always call the venue to confirm that it can accommodate your needs. The best source is usually to call the venue directly but you can call the broker as well and in most cases we can tell you directly or get that information for you.

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